Tree-pocalypse was no pulp fiction | chelseanow.com

Tree-pocalypse was no pulp fiction

A tree on Thompson St. did the split, then collapsed. Photo by Tequila Minsky

BY LINCOLN ANDERSON | The season’s first snowstorm brought about 150 trees crashing down across the city, and about half of those were in Manhattan, according to news reports. And trees reportedly lost twice as many branches as that.

Amid gusty winds, wet rain Thursday afternoon eventually turned into sleet. Leaves were still on the trees, and became weighed down with snow.

The combination was enough to topple scores of trees Downtown.

“Just got home and the block of E. 10th St. between Second and Third Aves. was completely closed because numerous large branches and trees are down in the street,” Katharine Wolpe reported just before 6 p.m. “The buildings don’t appear to be damaged, nor the parked cars. The Ninth Police Precinct has a car blocking access to the street.”

Downed trees on E. 10th St. Photo by Chris Ryan

“Uh…seems to be an inordinate amount of GIANT FALLEN TREE branches in the streets of the East Village. #careful #cyclists 11th street / 10th street / St Marks place #nyc #betterthanFire (poor pruning? High winds? Weight?) — feeling confused,” tweeted bike activist Chris Ryan around the same time.

Another collapsed tree on Thompson St. Photo by Tequila Minsky

Villager photographer Tequila Minsky was photographing a fallen tree on Thompson St. in Soho when firefighters were called to come take care of it. While she and others were waiting for the smoke eaters to arrive, another tree that was leaning began to lean even more, then cracked and fell. After 15 to 20 minutes, the firefighters got there, only for another tree to crack and fall.

Toppled trees on W. 16th St. Photos by Paul Groncki

Around 6:30 p.m., Paul Groncki reported that trees were down on the 100 block of W. 16th St., between Sixth and Seventh Aves.

According to news reports, a police officer was hit by a falling tree at 35th St. and Second Ave. and another tree fell on an ambulance on the Lower East Side.