Just Do Art: Week of Feb. 23, 2017 | chelseanow.com

Just Do Art: Week of Feb. 23, 2017

Olivia Beens’ ceramic work “Hecate’s Daughters at Women’s March” is on view at Carter Burden Gallery through March 23 as part of “Changing Patterns.” Photo courtesy Carter Burden Gallery.

Olivia Beens’ ceramic work “Hecate’s Daughters at Women’s March” is on view at Carter Burden Gallery through March 23 as part of “Changing Patterns.” Photo courtesy Carter Burden Gallery.

MARCH ART AT CARTER BURDEN GALLERY | In keeping with its mission to recognize both the relevance and ongoing creative evolution of artists 60 years of age and over, a March 2 opening reception at Carter Burden Gallery invites you to interact with those whose work can be seen for the next three weeks in their W. 28th St. space. In the east gallery, “Changing Patterns” showcases art by Olivia Beens, Claire Boren, and Sylvia Harnick. Gilded and brightly gazed faces that speak to the themes of identity, feminism, and spirituality are hallmarks of Beens’ ceramic sculptures. Abstract mixed media is the chosen mode of expression for Boren, who drew upon her childhood during World War II, the Holocaust, and disturbing current events for her contribution to “Patterns.” A dream was the inspiration for the atmospheric paintings taken from Harnick’s “Under the Sea” series, in which she explores time, place, and memory. In the west gallery, “Reflections” presents the layered, colorful oil paintings of Joan Mellon — and along the On the Wall space immediately outside the gallery, the linear assemblage of Elizabeth Jacobson’s “Sticks and Stones” installation merges recyclable plastic containers with cement, wood, and stone to invoke primitive totems as a source, and symbol, of strength in the face of harsh words employed as hateful deeds.

Opening reception Thurs., March 2, 6–8pm. Then, on view through March 23 at Carter Burden Gallery (548 W. 28th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves., Suite #534). Hours: Tues.–Fri., 11am–5pm and Sat., 11am–6pm. Visit carterburdengallery.org or call 212-564-8405.

REFUGEE-THEMED THEATER | Closed borders? Religious profiling? Forced deportation? Yes, it certainly does sound like…1862? Yes. First produced in that year and last seen on the American stage in 1966, “Leah, the Forsaken” is 19th-century playwright, critic, and theatrical impresario Augustin Daly’s drama about Jewish refugees. When Leah breaks the law by exiting Hungary to pass the night in an Austrian town, she falls for Rudolph, a Christian citizen, but is forced into exile when an obsessed persecutor convinces her love that she has betrayed him. A potent reminder of how fearing the “other” can allow a mob mentality to flourish, this production by the revival-minded Metropolitan Playhouse also strives to emphasize the play’s “nuanced affirmation of each individual’s potential for goodness, once freed from the burdens of ideology and custom.” Through March 12, Thurs.–Sat. at 7pm, Sun. at 3pm; at 220 E. Fourth St. (btw. Aves. A & B). Visit metropolitanplayhouse.org for tickets, which range from $10–$30.

At Metropolitan Playhouse through March 12, the timely subject matter of 1862’s “Leah, the Forsaken” includes religious profiling and closed borders. Photo by Jacob J. Goldberg Photography.

At Metropolitan Playhouse through March 12, the timely subject matter of 1862’s “Leah, the Forsaken” includes religious profiling and closed borders. Photo by Jacob J. Goldberg Photography.

Meanwhile, a few blocks west — but still in the East Village — the Kraine Theater (85 E. Fourth St., btw. Second Ave. & Bowery) is the setting for Horse Trade Theater Group’s Frigid Festival presentation of “The Refugee Plays.” Set in the present day, five short works by Charles Gershman, Penny Jackson, Callie Kimball, Carlos Castro, and Sean E. Cunningham address the concerns of refugees from Syria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Central South America. Fri., Feb. 24 at 6:50pm, Thurs., March 2 at 8:50pm and Sun., March 5 at 5:10pm. Tickets are $18. Visit horsetrade.info for reservations.

Also of note, March 3–5’s The International Human Rights Art Festival at Dixon Place (161A Chrystie St., btw. Delancey & Rivington Sts.) presents work from dozens of artists — including “Draw the Circle,” in which solo performer Mashuq Deen depicts the challenges of an immigrant family as a child transitions from one gender to another (Sat., March 4, 7pm). For the schedule and tickets, visit dixonplace.org ($20 per day for 12–6pm events; evening events are $15 in advance, $30 at the door).—BY SCOTT STIFFLER

ST. LUCIAN SCULPTOR’S NYC DEBUT ON VIEW IN CHELSEA

Jallim Eudovic's “Journey.” Photo by Daniel Marcion.

Jallim Eudovic’s “Journey.” Photo by Daniel Marcion.

BY ALEXANDRA SIMON | An internationally exhibited St. Lucian sculptor has brought his art to New York City for the first time. On view at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel through March 4, “Journey” showcases Jallim Eudovic’s interpretation of uncovering mankind — an exploration, he noted, of what is often hidden from the public eye.

Appearing as part of the gallery’s Winter Salon group show, the wooden tile piece “Journey” features the exposure of a different color on a solid background and, the artist explained, best describes the message he is trying to get across.

“Your skin is who you truly are and I really wanted to do something I can relate it to,” Eudovic said. “Everything we own is gift-wrapped and the skin on it — you have to pull back, and it’s a trick I wanted to correlate to conjure these feelings. Our skin very much like when a snake changes its skin to become something else.”

Eudovic comes from a family of artists, and through the years dabbling in multiple types of art helped him find his desire for sculpting, specifically incorporating humans into his works.

“I started off doing modern art, free-flowing forms, and it evolved into a more figurative [form] as I grew up,” he recalled. “Now I focus more on the human forms, the geometric forms, evolution, people, and human life.”

To stay inspired in his creativity and motivated to create new works, Eudovic said he explores a variety of other art forms.

“I’ve always been quite interested in creative writing, poetry, music, drawing, and painting,” he said. “But I gravitated to sculpting — it was in my immediate environment and that is what completes me.”

Through March 4 at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel (532 W. 25th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: 12:30-5:30pm, Tues.-Fri. Visit 532gallery.com or call 917-701-3338.