Community Activities: Week of April 14, 2016 | chelseanow.com

Community Activities: Week of April 14, 2016

Find every kind of art under the sun, at an Apr. 23 “Culture Shock” celebration of the High Line’s new programming season. Photo by Claudio Papapietro, courtesy Friends of the High Line.

Find every kind of art under the sun, at an Apr. 23 “Culture Shock” celebration of the High Line’s new programming season. Photo by Claudio Papapietro, courtesy Friends of the High Line.

CULTURE SHOCK: A HIGH LINE SPRING PROGRAMMING KICK-OFF | Think of it as an all-you-can-eat tasting event, but with talent taking the place of food. Spring heralds a new season of free programming on the High Line, and the Apr. 23 “Culture Shock” happening promises to immerse you in an eclectic-even-by-New-York-standards roster of music, dance, poetry, comedy and storytelling performances. The afternoon’s lineup — indicative of events scheduled to take place on the elevated park from the days of light jacket weather all the way through the first bitter chills of winter — has been hand-picked by event sponsor Friends of the High Line. Here’s some of the good stuff you’ll find on the plate:

Daniel Goode and the Flexible Orchestra lead a march-along, while providing accordion, trombone, clarinet and hub cap accompaniment; a living sculpture garden is populated by Heidi Latsky Dance troupe members; an “Other Voices” bilingual (English and American Sign Language) performance draws from stories shared by students from PS 347 The ASL & English Lower School; a cavalcade of local luminaries, courtesy of Nat Towsen’s High Line Variety Hour, do their thing; the “Calling All Pirates” interactive extravaganza helps you channel your inner superhero; today’s leading Nuyorican poets perform original spoken word works; the “¡Acopladitos!” bilingual (English and Spanish) family-friendly concert encourages you to sing along; curator Melanie Kress takes you on a tour of High Line Art; and, yes, they even have the dictionary definition of a tasting event — via savory and sweet food vendors, in the Chelsea Market Passage, at W. 15th St. Note: ASL interpreters will be available at the visitor information stations at Gansevoort & W. 16th Sts.

Free. Sat., Apr. 23, 12–4 p.m. on the High Line, from Gansevoort St. to W. 26th St. Rain date: Sat., Apr. 30, same time. Visit thehighline.org for more info.

Kanako Hayashi’s “The Time of Leaves” is among the video works on display along W. 22nd St.’s  “Sneak a Peek” route, Apr. 14–24. Image courtesy the artist.

Kanako Hayashi’s “The Time of Leaves” is among the video works on display along W. 22nd St.’s “Sneak a Peek” route, Apr. 14–24. Image courtesy the artist.

“SNEAK A PEEK” OPEN-AIR EXHIBTION | Stand on the street staring into your neighbor’s windows, and you’ll be called nosy (or worse!) — but this collaborative project, curated by Lal Bahcecioglu, applauds curiosity while encouraging art appreciation. “Sneak a Peek” features artworks displayed on TV screens in the windows of residences on W. 22nd St. Passersby will see the residences of their neighbors become temporary showplaces for works including Kanako Hayashi’s “The Time of Leaves,” in which contaminated golden yellow Ginkgo leafs evoke the aftermath of 2011’s devastating earthquake in Japan; and artist duo Ghost of a Dream’s new work, “The End Is Fine,” which uses two adjacent screens to display different ending sequences from classic films.

Free. On view Apr. 14–24, Thurs.–Sun., 6–9 p.m. along W. 22nd St., btw. Eighth & 10th Aves.). Opening reception: Thurs., Apr. 14, 8 p.m., in front of Chelsea Florist (NW corner of W. 22nd St. & Eighth Ave.). To schedule a guided tour, email lalbahcecioglu@gmail.com. Preview the project at lalbahcecioglu.com/sneak-a-peek.

NORTH CHELSEA WALKING TOUR | Give somebody directions to a popular Chelsea destination, and chances are you’ll be telling them, “Go West” — but there’s a northern portion, which accounts for nearly half of the neighborhood’s (highly debatable) borders. This walk, sponsored by the preservation-minded Save Chelsea coalition, covers the area between 23rd and 30th Sts. — where changes over the past decade have transformed a once-thriving wholesale and commercial loft district into a land of residential density and new businesses. Armed with a knowledge of zoning reform and infrastructure investment, self-described “free-range urbanist” Laurence Frommer leads the two-hour foot tour — taking into account not just the area’s rich history, but the practical requirements of ensuring the integrity of unprotected locations such as historic Tin Pan Alley.

Sun., Apr. 24, 2–4 p.m. Cost: $20. For reservations, visit savechelseany.org or send an email to savechelseanyc@gmail.com.

—BY SOTT STIFFLER