Buhmann on Art | chelseanow.com

Buhmann on Art

Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York Installation views, from “Michelangelo Pistoletto: The Minus Objects 1965-1966” (on view through May 11, at Luhring Augustine, Bushwick).

Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York
Installation views, from “Michelangelo Pistoletto: The Minus Objects 1965-1966” (on view through May 11, at Luhring Augustine, Bushwick).

MICHELANGELO PISTOLETTO:  THE MINUS OBJECTS 1965-1966
Born in Biella, Italy, in 1933, Pistoletto is best known for his Mirror Paintings and Minus Objects, which were fundamental to the birth of the Arte Povera movement in the 1960s. This exhibition focuses on the latter series, which radically upended the prevailing art trends of the time. Exhibited in 1966 in the artist’s studio in Turin, the Minus Objects comprise a group of disparate sculptural objects, striking for their individuality as well as their sheer diversity of form, media and means of production. Evolving in a spontaneous and organic manner, these objects seem as fresh as ever. Pistoletto still lives and works in Biella, where he founded the interdisciplinary laboratory Cittadellarte.

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Through May 11, at Luhring Augustine, Bushwick (25 Knickerbocker Ave., Bushwick, Brooklyn, corner of Ingraham St.). Hours: Thurs.-Sun., 12-6pm. Call 718-386-2746 or visit luhringaugustine.com.

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JULIAN SCHNABEL:  VIEW OF THE DAWN IN THE TROPICS: PAINTINGS, 1989–1990
Born in 1951, Schnabel came to art world fame in the 1980s with his large-scale paintings set on broken ceramic plates. Since then he has successfully branched out into film and won the award for best director at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, a Golden Globe, as well as a BAFTA, a César Award, two nominations for the Golden Lion and an Academy Award nomination. However, this exhibition looks back at a period when Schnabel was primarily known as a painter. He might not have re-invented the wheel back then, but he certainly knew how to draw attention. To be able to look back at this earlier period of his oeuvre will offer a good opportunity to re-evaluate its quality and ponder its longevity.

April 17–May 31, at Gagosian Gallery (555 W. 24th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm. Call 212-741-1111 or visit gagosian.com or julianschnabel.com.

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